The Launching of HolidayParkHoney.com

It’s official — we now have our own website. After several months of debating whether it was worth it, Ryan and I decided it was time to put our presence on the Web even though we are still a very small beekeeping operation.

For those of you who are not from Albuquerque or New Mexico it is important to know that urban beekeeping has taken off in this city and state over the past several years. The number of hobbyist beekeepers is amazing. There are also the larger commercial enterprises and then there are those who, like us, are in-between — that is, those who have more than one or two hives in the backyard but significantly less than those who have 100-2,000 commercial hives. Those are the folks who make their whole living off of bees and honey.

What has become the real big business here is beekeeping “schools” — businesses and individuals who make their living off of teaching others how to keep bees. Often times, they charge upwards of $400 for a week-long workshop. While we appreciate their efforts, we at Holiday Park Honey are of the belief that teaching people about beekeeping should be a cooperative effort that is less about making money for the individual and more about sharing knowledge through education and community service.

In most states, these types of services are offered by the County Cooperative Extension Office, which is in turn supported and sponsored by a state-run university. In tandem, these two entities share resources to interpret and extend relevant research-based knowledge into an understandable form to community members and to encourage the application of this knowledge to solve the problems of the beekeeping practitioner and other stakeholders. This cooperative effort serves the beekeeper, the community, and university researchers. In short, it makes for better and smarter beekeeping practices. New Mexico has no such effort. There is no master beekeeping program in this state. Most efforts to learn about healthy and sustainable beekeeping practices have a price tag attached to them, as such efforts are offered only by commercial enterprises.

As a result, Ryan and I are pursuing our Master Beekeeping Certification through Washington State’s Master Beekeeping Program. Our main focus is beekeeping education and awareness by:

  • Increasing public awareness about honey bees and beekeeping,
  • Encouraging mentorship and outreach, and
  • Supporting best-management and consistency in beekeeping practice

In order for us to achieve our goal of becoming master beekeepers, our commitment is to community service and outreach. We believe that this effort serves everyone’s best interests and makes for healthy people, healthy communities, and healthy economies. Please visit our site when you get a chance to learn about our beekeeping practices. And whether you’re seriously interested in beekeeping or just want to stand back and watch, we are always happy to have visitors.

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Preparing for the Honey Harvest

Ryan putting together all of our new honey supers. He’s preparing for the harvest, and getting some hive bodies for the new nucs that he’s creating.

We are Langstroth beekeepers, which means we use the stackable box hives as opposed to top-bar hives, and instead of using the shallow honey supers we use regular deep-hive bodies for the honey supers as well as the brood boxes. We didn’t do this for any¬† particular reason, just a matter of choice. There’s only one disadvantage to using deep-hive bodies for our supers: our extractor only fits three deep frames, whereas if we used the shallow supers it would take six at a time. It just makes the harvest take a little longer.

We’re eager to rob our girls!

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Too long!

It’s been too long since I’ve posted anything on this. TWO YEARS! Totally unacceptable. Lots has changed. Married, five hives, ABD doctoral student, and a baby daughter. Will post new stuff soon!

XXOO

Monica