The Launching of HolidayParkHoney.com

It’s official — we now have our own website. After several months of debating whether it was worth it, Ryan and I decided it was time to put our presence on the Web even though we are still a very small beekeeping operation.

For those of you who are not from Albuquerque or New Mexico it is important to know that urban beekeeping has taken off in this city and state over the past several years. The number of hobbyist beekeepers is amazing. There are also the larger commercial enterprises and then there are those who, like us, are in-between — that is, those who have more than one or two hives in the backyard but significantly less than those who have 100-2,000 commercial hives. Those are the folks who make their whole living off of bees and honey.

What has become the real big business here is beekeeping “schools” — businesses and individuals who make their living off of teaching others how to keep bees. Often times, they charge upwards of $400 for a week-long workshop. While we appreciate their efforts, we at Holiday Park Honey are of the belief that teaching people about beekeeping should be a cooperative effort that is less about making money for the individual and more about sharing knowledge through education and community service.

In most states, these types of services are offered by the County Cooperative Extension Office, which is in turn supported and sponsored by a state-run university. In tandem, these two entities share resources to interpret and extend relevant research-based knowledge into an understandable form to community members and to encourage the application of this knowledge to solve the problems of the beekeeping practitioner and other stakeholders. This cooperative effort serves the beekeeper, the community, and university researchers. In short, it makes for better and smarter beekeeping practices. New Mexico has no such effort. There is no master beekeeping program in this state. Most efforts to learn about healthy and sustainable beekeeping practices have a price tag attached to them, as such efforts are offered only by commercial enterprises.

As a result, Ryan and I are pursuing our Master Beekeeping Certification through Washington State’s Master Beekeeping Program. Our main focus is beekeeping education and awareness by:

  • Increasing public awareness about honey bees and beekeeping,
  • Encouraging mentorship and outreach, and
  • Supporting best-management and consistency in beekeeping practice

In order for us to achieve our goal of becoming master beekeepers, our commitment is to community service and outreach. We believe that this effort serves everyone’s best interests and makes for healthy people, healthy communities, and healthy economies. Please visit our site when you get a chance to learn about our beekeeping practices. And whether you’re seriously interested in beekeeping or just want to stand back and watch, we are always happy to have visitors.

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The Beekeeper’s Spring

As you can guess, springtime poses the greatest challenges for beekeepers. It’s a make-or-break time when you could easily lose a colony to cold snaps or starvation or swarming. This spring has been a particular challenge as Ryan has discovered that three of our colonies have become queenless in the past couple of weeks. Normally, the colony will notice if their queen is on her way out by her sparse laying pattern (or no laying at all). Their instinct is to rear a new queen so that she can begin laying eggs and building colony strength and numbers in preparation for the nectar flow. You don’t want your colonies to go queenless for too long, as it weakens the hive over a very short period of time. We’re not too certain what happened to these queens, but Ryan has instituted a queen-rearing project and hopes to have at least five new queens within the next couple of weeks. It will be interesting as this is the first time he will be doing this. As usual, he’s the consummate beekeeper — always equal to the task and ready to help his girls in any way he can.

On a lighter note, this spring has been a presentation spring for us. We were called upon to do a beekeeping presentation for Marissa Hamilton’s second-grade class at Hawthorne Elementary School here in Albuquerque. Ryan has been planning to make an observation hive for some time, and this was the perfect motivation for him to get the project completed. It was so great to see the looks on the childrens’ faces when we brought in our “glass” hive with the bees hard at work inside. Of course, I forgot the camera. {Post sad face emoticon here.}

We do have photos of another presentation we did for the Albuquerque Urban Beekeepers Association (ABQBeeks). Chantal Forster and Jessie Brown, co-coordinators of the group, invited us to the Spring Maintenance Meeting, where Ryan and I talked about maintenance of our Langstroth Hives. My presentation was pretty straightforward, but Ryan did a great talk on how he over-wintered a very weak colony by placing it on top of a stronger colony with a screened bottom board to allow for the warmth to sustain the weak hive during the coldest months. He also introduced his two-sided nuc hives, which were a great hit.

We hope to do more of these types of educational programs in the future, as we are both working toward our Master Beekeeper certification through the Washington State Beekeepers Association (New Mexico does not have such a program).

The greatest hit of all was the Observation Hive. Below are photos.

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